Coming up for air, briefly / by Dan

Thanks for all the responses to the Design with Intent Toolkit - it's got a heartening reception from lots of very interesting people, and has brought some great opportunities. I hope to be able to deal with all this effectively! Thanks too to all the people who've blogged about it, included it in a podcast, and spread it via Twitter. Your attention's much appreciated and if anyone does try it out on some problems, please do let me know how you get on, what would improve it, and so on. And more examples for each of the patterns are, of course, always welcome!

Printed copies (A2 poster, 135gsm silk finish) are available - the nominal listing on Amazon is £15 including postage, but if you'd like one for much less than that, let me know! (In fact, if you're willing to try it out on a design problem, fill in a survey about how you did it, and let me use it as a brief case study, you can have it free.)

Persuasive 2009

I say I'm just coming up for air briefly, as for the last couple of weeks, among some other major work (which could possibly bear some very nice fruit), I've been putting together my presentation* for Persuasive 2009, the Fourth International Conference on Persuasive Technology in Claremont, California, next week, and at present am desperately trying to finish a lot of other things before flying out on Saturday. It'll be my first time across the Atlantic and my girlfriend and I will be having a bit of a holiday afterwards, so I hope a lack of updates and replies, while little different to my usual pattern, will be excusable. But while the conference is on, if there's time and no hoo-hah with the wireless and it seems appropriate, I'll try and do a bit of blogging, or more likely, Twittering about it (#persuasive2009 ?). There are some very interesting people presenting their work.

Anyway, if you missed the update to my earlier post, a preprint version of my paper (with David Harrison, Tim Holley and Neville A. Stanton), Influencing Interaction: Development of the Design with Intent Method [PDF, 1.6MB] is available. At some point soon this version of the paper will downloadable from Brunel’s research archive, while the ‘proper’ version will be available in the ACM Digital Library. ACM requires me to state the following alongside the link to the preprint:

© ACM, 2009. This is the authors’ version of the work. It is posted here by permission of ACM for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive version will be published in Proceedings of Persuasive 2009: Fourth International Conference on Persuasive Technology, Claremont, CA, 26-29 April 2009, ACM Digital Library. ISBN 978-1-60558-376-1.

The presentation will include many parts of the paper, but the nature of academic papers like this (submitted in December) is that they are out of date before anyone reads them. So, much of the presentation will be about the DwI toolkit and the reasoning behind bits of it, rather than just sticking to the state of the research six months ago - I hope that's reasonable. Last year, presenting on the last day of the conference meant that I was able to spend many hours in a hotel room in Oulu editing and re-editing the presentation (mostly listening to the Incredible Bongo Band's version of In-a-Gadda-da-Vida on repeat) to match what I thought the audience would like, and incorporate things I'd learned during the conference, but this time I'm on the first day so there isn't that opportunity...

Interfaces article

Also this month, I have a brief article about my research in Interfaces, the magazine of Interaction, the British Computer Society's HCI Group, in its 'My PhD' series (p. 20-21). Interfaces no. 78 is available to download here (make sure to click on the link below the cover image, as - at time of writing - the cover's linked to the previous issue). It's a great magazine - redesigned for this issue - with some really interesting features about aspects of HCI by some well-known names in the field. Thanks to Eduardo Calvillo and Stephen Hassard for making the article possible.

The table in the article was unfortunately truncated during editing so (if I get it in in time) there'll be a brief addendum in the next issue with the full table, but I might as well make it available here too [PDF, 8kb] - it's a brief, not especially exciting summary of some concepts for influencing householders to close curtains at night to save energy. (At some point I'll do a full case study on this as there are some interesting ideas as well as some very impractical ones.)

*Taking Parkinson's Law as an instruction manual seems to be a perpetual habit of mine, so the maximum time allocated to get the presentation done has been more than entirely taken up by getting the presentation done... it's still not quite there, and I'm not sure whether the format of the auditorium's going to allow an interactive element which I would very much like to include but probably won't be able to. Also - while Prezi looks like it might be everything I've ever wanted in presentation software - the workflow of "doing a PowerPoint" for me has evolved into a long chain of "Photoshop - Illustrator - export - Photoshop - Save for Web - insert into PowerPoint" which I'm sure I could do more quickly, but lots of conferences and seminars want PPTs rather than PDFs, and the only Mac I have (which once - kind of - belonged to the Duke of Edinburgh [interesting story]) is too slow and old to run anything better.